I voted leave part 2

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Re: I voted leave part 2

Postby Scooterman » 06 Jun 2019, 21:57

They're pacifists! :lol:

Or is that the Greens :problem:
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Re: I voted leave part 2

Postby sad_vampire » 07 Jun 2019, 02:29

Interesting Peterborough results, Labour win but with only 31% of the vote, down from 48%. Tories 21% down from 47%. Brexit Party 29% from a standing start.

Looks like all the Labour & Tory MPs are going to want to avoid a General Election at any cost.

cheers
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Re: I voted leave part 2

Postby Burgerman » 07 Jun 2019, 05:23

Definitely. Many will lose their cushy jobs. Remember that peterboghorror is full of immigrants. All who hate brexit for obvious reasons. Around a third of the vote from a party that is 2 months old in spite of that!

If you ask the typical voter most have barely heard of the brexit party. That will also change over the next few months. Remember that the left biased pro remain BBC are effectively refusing to let anything but remainers on their programs. E.G. Question time yesterday, 4 remainers out of 4 panel (yet again) for the 4th week running before the peterborough election. Wonder why... That alone could have gained the miserable few 600 votesor 2% more needed to win. They will get more % of the vote as people get to hear. Esp in places like mine, where brexit got 73% in the referendum.
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Re: I voted leave part 2

Postby wheelie junkie » 07 Jun 2019, 11:45

A bad night for Farage, 61% voted leave and Brexit party failed to win the seat. The only positive was they took almost all the Tory vote.Labour taking about the same share as the last general election, scary that they did so but probably down to a one trick pony policy party not being attractive to those wanting policies for the running of the country. Voters seeing that Brexit isn't the only thing to consider unlike the "protest" vote for European elections. Labour's vague Brexit stance not impacting on their votes. The prospect of a Corbyn government getting closer.
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Re: I voted leave part 2

Postby greybeard » 07 Jun 2019, 12:35

< but probably down to a one trick pony policy party not being attractive to those wanting policies for the running of the country. >

You think so?

This old cynic suspects the labour win was more likely due to massive postal voting fraud, with a little help from the Muslim block vote (made compulsory by their imams).

It's not as if labour don't have form for employing these tactics.
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Re: I voted leave part 2

Postby wheelie junkie » 07 Jun 2019, 13:22

Yes, I think that people see beyond Brexit, it is a one off event and has disrupted the country. Things like the Care in Crisis documentary revealing that the government green paper on funding for care has been postponed 5 times because of Brexit bring home that we need to think about everyday life.

We just need it over with and to move on.
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Re: I voted leave part 2

Postby greybeard » 07 Jun 2019, 13:43

Yes. We do need it over with. But only if the government gives us the clean Brexit they were mandated by the 2016 referendum. Too many are playing fast and loose with our sacred democracy and this has to end before everyone gets so sick of it that whining remainers get their own way and Brexit is abandoned. We must stick with our traditional principles of good government and honour the referendum result.
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Re: I voted leave part 2

Postby wheelie junkie » 07 Jun 2019, 17:08

Principles of good government? Long gone I'm afraid from Blair deceiving parliament on Iraq, through uncaring years of austerity to a failed attempt at direct democracy. Our representative democracy is not fit for purpose and big decisions need to be decided by the people, parliament should then just rubber stamp not debate or change. How Brexit should of been done, the referendum should have been legally binding, with a date for departure, with a pre agreed negotiating team and terms for negotiations, a fixed commitment to leave on the date even if negotiations weren't complete no extensions. All written into the legislation for the referendum, no get outs.

We can't trust politicians so limit their powers and we take control. PR so smaller parties who get votes but no MP's and coalitions to prevent radical change.
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Re: I voted leave part 2

Postby Burgerman » 07 Jun 2019, 18:27

>>>Principles of good government? Long gone I'm afraid from Blair deceiving parliament on Iraq, through uncaring years of austerity to a failed attempt at direct democracy.

Austerity = living within your means.
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Re: I voted leave part 2

Postby wheelie junkie » 07 Jun 2019, 18:36

Burgerman wrote:>>>Principles of good government? Long gone I'm afraid from Blair deceiving parliament on Iraq, through uncaring years of austerity to a failed attempt at direct democracy.

Austerity = living within your means.


Whilst using £bn's in QE to prop up the economy, £bn's in international aid, 100's of £m on wasted Brexit ferries. I'll amend that to "governments with no fiscal control"
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Re: I voted leave part 2

Postby Burgerman » 07 Jun 2019, 20:17

Having met a few MPs, of all parties, I am not at all surprised by any of it. Every one seems to be totally clueless about anything much.

In any case, farage party was 600 votes off a win after 2 months. But its a local election. About local stuff. Labour always does well there because of loads of daft promises and all paid for by the magic money tree.

But because that magic money tree will come from nowhere or things like corbyns 'garden tax', then come general erection nobody will vote for him. Only a complete moron could realistically vote corbyn! And brexit party will win.

https://www.express.co.uk/news/uk/11361 ... y-damaging

Hes a moron.
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Re: I voted leave part 2

Postby Burgerman » 08 Jun 2019, 01:23

And, THIS is why they will allow extentions, and insist on a 2nd vote, anything to keep us in. $$$$$$
And they NEED to sell us their stuff or it will get worse faster.
Not to mention many want out of the eurozone...
The EU is a joke, and is collapsing as predicted.

https://www.express.co.uk/finance/city/ ... ashed-ZERO

https://www.express.co.uk/finance/city/ ... gle-Brexit

https://www.express.co.uk/finance/city/ ... d-go-UNDER

https://www.express.co.uk/finance/city/ ... gle-Brexit

https://www.express.co.uk/finance/city/ ... stop-slide
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Re: I voted leave part 2

Postby wheelie junkie » 08 Jun 2019, 11:51

The most important part of the result is a constituency that 61% voted to Leave with a 67% turnout, Brexit party took 29% of a 48% turnout. Why did those leave voters not support the Brexit party? If I was Farage I'd be starting to realise that the one trick pony needs more tricks, there is a lot more to winning seats than one policy. It is frightening that Labour retained their voters given the lack of clarity on Brexit but they did campaign on other issues, probably the ones that will bankrupt the country. Tories now with little hope of surviving given the swing to Brexit party must have been former Tory voters.

If the EU is so close to collapse we could wait until it does and claim our share of the trade agreements and negotiate deals with the individual EU countries we want to.

We've yet to see if they really do want our money, they were willing to let May try and get her deal through right up to the deadline. It'll take a deadline with us prepared to no deal to push them to find out how desperate they really are. Johnson will bottle it at the last minute even if he does promise a no deal exit on 31 October.
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Re: I voted leave part 2

Postby Burgerman » 08 Jun 2019, 17:28

If the EU is so close to collapse we could wait until it does and claim our share of the trade agreements and negotiate deals with the individual EU countries we want to.

Those posts are not about the EU which will collapse or change in time because non of its mebers actually want what its trying to do.

They are about the EURO which is an unstable currency that has a fixed exchange rate, and massive problems that this causes across wildly different countries who cannot now have a naturally balanced exchange rate that suits each ones economy. Hence all the poor (both meanings) mediteranian countries. And their huge debt problems. They need to lower the value, to increase sales of their manufactured goods. But they cant. So they get more and more in debt. And then need to lower it yet further, and they still cant. And now the EU are doing huge levels of QE to try to stay afloat because of the poor performance of the currency and the increase in debt in the failing countries... And its not working.

Of course all the CBI and BANK of ENGLAND, and the usual suspects said that we MUST join or it would be a disaster... Inc the chancellor, and all the big companies on both sides of the channel, etc etc. Which are the same groups that ALWAYS get everything ass backwards wrong EVERY SINGLE TIME. And are the same ones doing project fear for the last 3 years. OUT NO DEAL will be a disaster. Which again is scare mongering bollox.

So why stay in, and end up proping up failed countries economies or the euro, when we can GET OUT FAST before all the shit hits the fan. And THEN do all the deals with each country, or the EU as and when they realise they need the trade...
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Re: I voted leave part 2

Postby wheelie junkie » 09 Jun 2019, 14:53

Major, Blair and Brown all said we wouldn't join the euro, the lack of flexibility and ability to control via exchange rates reasons against. To me it isn't even worth a discussion on, obviously flawed and I have no idea why any country would join.

It'll be the catalyst for the break up of the EU, inability to control exchange rates and inability to control fiscal policy will result in major problems and social unrest with governments tied and the only option is to leave the EU.

As can be seen from the divided nation leaving because the EU has failed gives no remain option so a unified country plus we get the bits we want like trade deals without giving anything in return. The dilemma is how long before it fails.
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Re: I voted leave part 2

Postby Burgerman » 09 Jun 2019, 14:57

I gave it a decade. To radically change back to a trade club. Or to collapse. 5 years ago.
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Re: I voted leave part 2

Postby Burgerman » 16 Jun 2019, 02:17

Express, https://www.express.co.uk/news/uk/11409 ... gel-farage

A POWERFUL group of Brexiteer MPs have backed Boris Johnson as new Tory leader – so long as he sticks to their terms.
By David Maddox, Political Editor

But the price for their support is ditching Theresa May’s deal and going for a no-deal EU exit, they have warned him. Boris Johnson has also been told in clear terms in their ultimatum that he and the Tory party will be finished if he fails to get Britain out by October 31. The Brexiteer MPs in the European Research Group (ERG) will quit and join Nigel Farage’s Brexit Party – sparking a seismic change in British politics.

Writing in the Sunday Express, Mr Farage warns he fears the former London Mayor “will not deliver on his promises”. And he added “Tory defectors would be welcome in the Brexit Party.” Additional demands from the ERG include giving Mr Farage and senior Brexit Party members seats in the House of Lords, as well as welcoming them into the Conservatives after Brexit.

They have also told him to allow constituency associations to control the selection of candidates and to ensure Brexiteers hold the big jobs in the Government and the party.

Mr Johnson has been reminded what happened to the Conservative Party in Canada, which was virtually wiped out in 1993 when it failed to deliver on its promises.

Meanwhile, supporters have said a victory for Mr Johnson is a chance “to drain the swamp in Whitehall”, in the words of one Brexiteer, and remove Remainer civil service mandarins such as Brexit negotiator Ollie Robbins and Cabinet Secretary Sir Mark Sedwill.

A former minister said: “Boris has been told straight. We have backed him but he has got to keep his word. We have to leave on October 31 or it is over.


“The donors will be gone, the members will be gone and MPs will go. We will have no choice, it will have to be the Brexit Party.

“We have had promises from a Theresa May Government and been let down, we cannot be let down by a Boris Johnson Government. If we are, it is over.”

The cost of ERG support also means even a compromise on Mrs May’s deal has to be off the table.

They have demanded a managed no-deal with Britain and the EU, exchanging General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT) short term deals to gain free access for imports and exports while a free trade deal is negotiated.


If the EU refuses to cooperate, Mr Johnson has been told he needs to pursue an aggressive trade and tax policy.

The senior ERG member said: “He [Boris] has to take us out with a managed no-deal, no messing around with the Northern Ireland border, GATT agreements exchanged (to allow free trade to continue while a deal is negotiated), and to then start negotiating a free trade agreement.

“If the EU don’t play ball we cut corporation tax, we give bungs to farming and the car industry and we compete hard.”

The senior ERG member also made it clear that Mr Johnson has been told he must appoint Leave supporters to the big roles in government and the party.

“He [Boris] understands that but the key test will be who gets the key roles – Chancellor, party chairman, leader of the House, Brexit Secretary, Foreign Secretary – they have to be Leavers.”

It is understood the role of party chairman will go to former cabinet minister Priti Patel to allow her to deliver reform of the party operation, including a clear out of Conservative central office and handing back control of candidate selection to constituency associations.

Ms Patel has denied that she has been offered a job in Mr Johnson’s government, but writing for the Sunday Express yesterday she said he is the “change candidate” who can deliver party reform.”

She said: “I have long advocated holding a members’ day at party conference and even going as far as having a directly elected chairman of the party who is accountable to the membership.”

The issue of party members taking back control comes as the Campaign for Conservative Democracy published demands for reform of the party.

Local associations have been pressing to allowed to deselect Remainer MPs who broke their manifesto promises in a bid to stop Brexit.

Pressure is mounting on Beaconsfield MP Dominic Grieve with the Beaconsfield Constituency Conservative Association Democracy in Action campaign launching a bid to deselect him after he lost a vote of confidence last month.

There is strong support from Tory MPs for Mr Johnson to reach out to Mr Farage and his supporters in the Brexit Party.

One MP said: “We have loads of Lib Dems in the Lords, so why not give seats to the Brexit Party. Boris has to deliver this.”

Another added: “When Brexit is done we should invite these people (Brexit Party members) into the Conservatives, they are basically Conservatives. I think Boris knows that.”

Former Tory leadership contender Esther McVey declared her support for Mr Johnson to replace Theresa May yesterday.



Theres going to be fun ahead! As I said, I have confidence in the system. We will leave, and without any 'deal'. cheers
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Re: I voted leave part 2

Postby wheelie junkie » 16 Jun 2019, 13:11

We'll leave on 31 October but won't be able to control borders as we haven't put what is needed in place. No guarantee that we will have drugs stockpiled so I will be asking my GP for more prescriptions to do my own stockpiling. NHS weren't ready for the March leaving date, can't see that they will be ready for October, heads buried in the sand.
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Re: I voted leave part 2

Postby Burgerman » 16 Jun 2019, 13:54

We'll leave on 31 October but won't be able to control borders as we haven't put what is needed in place.

If we had decided to actually do what I and the biggest number of voters ever in any referendum or vote said, we would have had the last 2 years to do that. But the remainers screwed everything up. By which I mean parliment.

No guarantee that we will have drugs stockpiled so I will be asking my GP for more prescriptions to do my own stockpiling. NHS weren't ready for the March leaving date, can't see that they will be ready for October, heads buried in the sand.


Project fear is working well on you.
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Re: I voted leave part 2

Postby wheelie junkie » 16 Jun 2019, 18:51

And even now we are no where near ready despite the realisation we will exit without an agreement. Boris wanting to use technology to negate the backstop. Dream on.

Not project fear, far from it. I'm seeing medical professionals from different NHS services all the time. They say almost no preparation has been made for a no deal exit and the impact on big pharma. Many were in the NHS when we entered the millenium and saw the preparation for the feared computer crash, they say that it just isn't comparable. Almost certainly Dover can't cope with a no deal exit, there will be delays on goods entering and exiting, one would hope that common sense applies and we accept current safety standards from the EU but who knows? Until we get clarity that customs will accept EU drugs there is a risk,personally I would rather cover it.

I don't know about anyone else but the last few months I've struggled to get different drugs from my usual pharmacy and we have had to ring around to get them. Same goes for things like suction catheters and trache inner tubes, local DN team can't get them so we have had to ask my home vent team to raid hospital supplies. No idea what is causing this but it hasn't happened previously. A situation that could get worse so I won't risk things, choking to death on my own phlegm because we don't have catheters holds little appeal.
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Re: I voted leave part 2

Postby Burgerman » 16 Jun 2019, 19:16

And even now we are no where near ready despite the realisation we will exit without an agreement. Boris wanting to use technology to negate the backstop. Dream on.


Boris is a plant. He voted for mays surrender document. He is there as the popular man that "says" out, (the LEAVE candidate) but he will be the same as may. So he is not really interested in leaving. Only in losing a few votes. He WANTS a remainer to win. Like may when she also vanished during her general erection. That was because she WANTED less power so remainers in parliment could could destroy brexit and she wouldnt get the blame. Thats why he has been completely missing, and is not on the TV debating with all the rest right now on ITV.

Not project fear, far from it. I'm seeing medical professionals from different NHS services all the time. They say almost no preparation has been made for a no deal exit and the impact on big pharma.


Rubbish. Thats exactly what it is. A few weeks disruption at worst. There wont be any shortages, or hardly any. Maybe a little initially as change always causes a short term termoil. Its all that big remainer fear bullshit again. Nobody is stopping anyone buying or selling anything from anyone else. You have obviously never traded much. Businesses, even socialist NHS style ones buy from companies. Not countries. And they still will. The businesses need to sell. The customer needs to buy. Thats all. The shipping copanies need to ship too They pay whatever the bill is. It may be higher or lower, and may even prompt them to buy cheaper elsewhere since they need a good kick up the rear to wake them up.

Many were in the NHS when we entered the millenium and saw the preparation for the feared computer crash, they say that it just isn't comparable. Almost certainly Dover can't cope with a no deal exit, there will be delays on goods entering and exiting,


There will be more checking and paperwork. Initially. We have had 3 years to deal with that. Just as we already do with the rest of the world. Delays? Yes. A few days once organised. Thats why I used to order regular stuff from turkey (tiles in bulk) 2 months early. Its no problem once you figure out the logistics change. The fact that we have not dealt with the ports/airports is the fault of all those useless gits in government. They SHOULD have got their act together 3 years back. Its was obvious from day 1 what leave means. It didnt mean stay in and pretend. Or remain. Or BRINO. That was all the remainers in government trying to ignore the vote. And as I said, that was never going to happen. The last 3 years embarassing in the extreme, was a sheer waste of time.

one would hope that common sense applies and we accept current safety standards from the EU but who knows?


Most of those were OUR rules. But why should the damned EU tell us what is safe. We have our own government and we can improve on all of that without having to try and make about 25 backward countries comply.

Until we get clarity that customs will accept EU drugs there is a risk, personally I would rather cover it.


Of course we will accept them for now. But we may improve safety and regulations in the future, and then they will change what they make to comply. Thats all for future trade deals with the world.

I don't know about anyone else but the last few months I've struggled to get different drugs from my usual pharmacy and we have had to ring around to get them. Same goes for things like suction catheters and trache inner tubes, local DN team can't get them so we have had to ask my home vent team to raid hospital supplies. No idea what is causing this but it hasn't happened previously.


Well its not brexit because it hasnt happened! And when it does it stiill wont be brexit. Remember that theres350 million people in the US alone, and they are not in the EU, and get all that stuff way faster, without the fight we have to go through. In fact much of my stuff COMES from the US now. And of course theres another 200 countries not in the EU all doing fine for medical supplies if they can afford them. Its a money problem not a brexit problem!

A situation that could get worse so I won't risk things, choking to death on my own phlegm because we don't have catheters holds little appeal.


Buy 1000 online from the US for your cupboard. You can sell them online when your shortages happen for large profits. They will be only too pleased to supply. Its an inefficient socialist controlled medical system thats the problem, not brexit! I might add that WE are now the best performing economy in the EU.
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Re: I voted leave part 2

Postby Burgerman » 17 Jun 2019, 00:10

New statesean 3 months ago....And its now worse.

NEW STATESMAN

As surprising as it may seem to British commentators caught up in their own psychodrama, Brexit is not the main issue keeping European leaders awake at night. A stagnant economy, the rise of China, and the huge divides between member states on how to deal with these issues are at the top of most EU leaders’ minds.

The Eurozone, having entirely failed to solve any of the structural problems that led to the 2011 debt crisis, is now teetering on the edge of recession. Industrial production in Germany – the powerhouse of the bloc – slowed more sharply than expected in January. Italy has already fallen into recession, partly due to the deflationary economic policy forced on it by Brussels – and its ailing banks may yet be the source of another debt crisis. Economic confidence in the Eurozone has fallen for the ninth month in a row and has now reached its lowest level since 2013.

In this context, Brexit is simply adding insult to injury. The departure of the UK without a deal would harm manufacturers across the continent. With deflationary fiscal policy now institutionalised, the European Central Bank concluding its quantitative easing programme, and productivity outstripping wage growth across much of the bloc, the Eurozone’s current account surplus has been the crutch supporting demand over the last several years. The threat of tariffs on trade with the UK could tip the already weak Eurozone economies over the edge.

But the danger that has EU leaders truly terrified originates from China. In a demonstration of the power dynamics that truly underline the EU project, the French President Emmanuel Macron, German Chancellor Angela Merkel and EU Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker met the Chinese President Xi Jinping this week to discuss relations between the two hegemons.

Just days before, the EU published a “strategic outlook” on China in which it called the world’s second-largest economy a “systemic rival” which was “promoting alternative models of governance”. Yet China is also a huge source of demand in the bloc, both through exports and foreign direct investment.

It is in this context, and in advance of the European elections, that Macron and Merkel have been outlining their visions for the future of the EU. In a speech at the end of February, Merkel outlined plans for an EU-wide industrial strategy in order to counter the threat from Asia.

Macron’s ambitious proposals include providing the EU with a central budget to finance innovation, introducing a social security “shield” for all workers across Europe, increasing defence spending, “protecting” the EU’s borders, and reining in the big tech monopolies. This, he hopes, would support innovation and growth among the EU economies.

It didn’t take long for reality to stymie both leaders’ lofty aims. EU competition policy prevented a merger between two big rail providers – Siemens and Alstom – even as Merkel and other German politicians spoke of the need for a more permissive attitude towards mergers between European companies in order to counter the threat from huge Chinese corporations.

Meanwhile, the Danish Prime Minister Lars Løkke Rasmussen denounced Macron’s plans for a central European budget, which he claimed would “politicise” the EU’s economic policy. He used the rest of his intervention to argue that the EU must stand firm in its commitment to free markets, rather than attempting to “copy and paste” the Chinese model, in a clear rebuke to Merkel. “We shouldn’t,” he said, “pick winners”.

Macron suffered another blow yesterday when separate plans for a central Eurozone budget were watered down, leaving the pot worth perhaps just €22bn over seven years. The plan had been part of a wider French attempt to put the Eurozone on a path towards becoming a true economic union.

There is a familiar pattern to European economic policy. For every step forward European leaders have taken since the financial crisis, they have taken two steps back. While many worry about China, slowing global growth, and a no-deal Brexit, the truly existential questions the EU faces are internal. And they are all about power.

Who will pick up the tab for economic stimulus, financial stability and industrial strategy – northern European states, big business, or southern Europe’s impoverished citizens? Who makes policy – unelected bureaucrats, the European parliament, or member states? And who will determine the future of the bloc should the UK leave – Germany, France, or Brussels?

Europe’s leaders are no closer to answering any of these questions today than they were a decade ago when this crisis began. If they cannot provide answers soon, events might just overtake them. Every minute EU leaders waste brings the European project one step closer to collapse.
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Re: I voted leave part 2

Postby wheelie junkie » 17 Jun 2019, 14:18

Business might want to trade but we need to follow WTO guidelines and haven't got enough customs officers to do it nor the legal systems. Driving a lorry full of drugs which haven't got the correct testing/documents off a ferry and into a customs point won't get far. It'll be held there until sorted, which is a delay. We could accept the drugs IF we had sorted all of the different testing and duty rates in advance, I honestly can't see that happening.

They need to be recruiting customs officers and building new customs points, the French have already started on that and everyone says they don't want us to leave. Why spend all that money for an event you don't expect to happen? Because they are prepared to watch us go.
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Re: I voted leave part 2

Postby Burgerman » 17 Jun 2019, 15:51

Business might want to trade but we need to follow WTO guidelines and haven't got enough customs officers to do it nor the legal systems.


Here we go with the project fear bullshit again. Even if we dont, we soon will... So who cares.

Driving a lorry full of drugs which haven't got the correct testing/documents off a ferry and into a customs point won't get far. It'll be held there until sorted, which is a delay. We could accept the drugs IF we had sorted all of the different testing and duty rates in advance, I honestly can't see that happening.


You worry too much after listening to project fear. Its strong in you... Its also bollox. Confusiuon at first, back to normal service fast.

They need to be recruiting customs officers and building new customs points, the French have already started on that and everyone says they don't want us to leave. Why spend all that money for an event you don't expect to happen? Because they are prepared to watch us go.


I certainly hope so. We should have gone, THREE YEARS AGO!!!
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Re: I voted leave part 2

Postby wheelie junkie » 18 Jun 2019, 12:29

Not project fear, that is the consequence of not being ready. I know that you don't like rules but they are needed when it comes to trade. Companies aren't registering for the different schemes to ease problems and we aren't doing enough to be ready, project fear doesn't exist if we are prepared, it becomes project reality if we aren't.

Obviously given time issues can be sorted but that doesn't help on November 1.

Given that there is little chance that we will have a PM that can change the withdrawal agreement they should be working on the basis that no deal is the reality but their egos suggest that they think that they'll succeed so little effort will go into no deal planning. That is project fear for me.
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Re: I voted leave part 2

Postby Burgerman » 18 Jun 2019, 17:42

Thats because the 85% majority in parliment voted remain. And so far have refused to leave. That includes may, most of the cabinet, and the likes of Hunt, and that gob on a stick whos name I cant remember. Even boris didnt know if he should remain or leave. And basically tossed a coin. The lot of them are treasonous, and have ignored the vote. And are still doing it.

Only ester mcveigh and dominic show any balls. But they are both planning on actually leaving, so they will never get into the final 2. Why? Those voting for them do not want to LEAVE!

Another vote. They have now removed dominic raab. So the only 2 real leavers, already removed.
They have done exactly as expected. They have a fake leaver (boris) who didnt know which way to vote and voted foir mays surrender deaal twice.
And one of the othr 4 remainers left in. Probably the gob on a stick rory remainer, or jeremy cunt.

So the brexit party are looking more likely by the day. Since they STILL dont get it.
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Re: I voted leave part 2

Postby wheelie junkie » 19 Jun 2019, 17:12

Blame is easy to apportion but won't alter the reality that we aren't prepared for a no deal exit. They need to be building customs posts at Dover now, recruiting and training customs officers, implementing computer software to pre register lorries entering into the system. Unless we rely upon Johnson's zero duty lunacy, he can't grasp that we need our exports to be zero duty not imports. Project fear caused by incompetence.
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Re: I voted leave part 2

Postby Burgerman » 19 Jun 2019, 17:36

You worry too much. And miss the BIGGER PICTURE.
It matters 100x more that we exit the damned collapsing and restrictive, overpowering EU that takes our power, our laws our sovereinty, and our money, and forces us into a socialist union where some twit in brussels decides on everything ASAP than a few temporary port delay issues.

It simply does not matter in the big picture. You are all hung up on a few details. You cant make an omelette without breaking a few eggs. I do not care if it causes delays, job losses, worse enonomically, etc etc JUST AS THE GOV LEAFELET SAYS. (although most of this wont happen or will be short term). Because I want OUT and was forewarned along with all the rest of the votors that it would happen, and we voted for this IN SPITE of the warnings.

We didnt vote because it wouldnt cause problems in the short term. We voted because idealogically we wanted no part of this EU superstate. We wanted our country back. I dont care about anything else, as much as GETTING OUT NOW. Deal with any other problems afterwards. These are all just excuses. And are all inor issues that we can figure out later. They dwell on these things because they will not LEAVE, dont really want to leave, and the more minor tehnicalities they think up the less easy it is to get on with doing what we voted for.
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Re: I voted leave part 2

Postby wheelie junkie » 20 Jun 2019, 09:59

Bigger pictures you describe is not what I see. The bigger picture is our political system not worrying about something that you think takes control. It is stupidity to pass things like human rights to our current politicians. We need to have control of them before they get more power. Instead people worry about the EU.It doesn't matter if we are in for a few more years what really matters is that we have the right political system as it is quite clear representative democracy isn't working.
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Re: I voted leave part 2

Postby Burgerman » 20 Jun 2019, 10:36

It is working Its slow But come the next erection you will see it work Its already working in that we had a referendum. We got to choose. All that has to happen now is those polititians in power either do as we told them or that they get to lose 95k plus car, house, expenses a year in the next election. And they will do one or the other.

And farage appeared, and HIS results in eu vote has already held their feet to the fire and concentrated their opinions over what should be done...

Dont worry. It works. They are just slow to figure out that the peoples will and vote was more important that the 80% remainers bias in parliments own ideas. As they will soon find out. Mine is already worried. Has just recently voted against the labour whip for 2 votes on a 2nd referendum. Why? Big house to lose... She already blew it, she is out at the next erection. She is now panicking. She igored the will of the 73% leave town.
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